Archive for February, 2015

February 25, 2015

The artist formerly known as……

So it’s official. We are no longer C***A.  We will now be pushing forward with our new name, a new strategy and new resolve as the charity that aims to end domestic abuse. We are SafeLives.  Please go to our lovely new website and watch the animation on the front page which says it all. More to follow…

And keep track of the news on Twitter from our national conference today where we are going to be talking about Getting it Right First Time.

#SafeLives

February 22, 2015

A taster for Wednesday….

On Wednesday we are holding our annual national conference with the theme of ‘Getting Right First Time.’ We will be looking at different ways to respond sooner to victims, children and perpetrators.  Our keynote speaker in the morning with be Dr Eamon McCrory from UCL who will talk about the impact of domestic abuse on the brain development of young children.  In case you want a bit more information about this – and the wider impact on the health of adults.  See this TED talk from Dr Nadine Burke Harris http://www.ted.com/talks/nadine_burke_harris_how_childhood_trauma_affects_health_across_a_lifetime with some amazingly powerful messages.

Ok, maybe more than a taster….this talk has had 320,000 views already.

February 16, 2015

Piecing together the evidence-2

Last month I noted the evidence from some recent DHRs which showed the high percentage of women murdered by their partners who were still in a relationship. This was reconfirmed by the evidence from the Femicide Census published last week which reflects the tireless work of Karen Ingala Smith on this subject.

In the Femicide Census data, which spans almost 700 murders from 2009-2013, 58% of women were still in a relationship with the person who killed them. Over half had been in the relationship for over 5 years.

So this is where the gap lies – services for women who can’t or don’t leave for whatever reason and for older women. Our data across all types of practitioners- not just IDVAs – shows that about 80% of clients who engage are separated or separating.

Where is the exception to this? IDVAs working in hospitals where half their clients are still in the relationship.

So location matters. And so do the choices we offer women to ‘stay’ safely.

February 8, 2015

Catching up on some reading…

Like most of us, I tend to carry around a pile of articles and research findings to read.

Today I caught up on the findings from the Provide conference held in Bristol before Christmas. This programme is led by Prof Gene Feder and includes both pilot trials followed by randomised control trials.

Of particular interest I think are the findings of the PATH (psychological advocacy towards healing) trial. In PATH, women are offered not only conventional advocacy such as given by an IDVA, but also the advocate delivers some psychological therapy. This helps bridge the gap between women experiencing much higher levels of mental illness than the average, but also the reality that even those who do disclose mental health issues are unlikely to get an effective intervention from mental health services. For more information go to http://www.bristol.ac.uk/social-community-medicine/projects/provide/evidence-into-practice/provide-conference/

The study showed firstly that PATH filled a gap and secondly that the intervention gave enduring benefit for over a year.

We are keen to make the links between practical advocacy and longer term ‘recovery’ support. This looks like a promising example. Please let us know if you have emerging good ideas in your area.